Lecosho: one burger to rule them all

I continue to devour this seemingly impossible burger, yet I don’t recall reading or hearing about where it hails from. How do they do it? This beats my own ground burger. Could it be The One Burger?

I love a good burger. I grew up with a particular style of homemade burger–what dad used to call a “Better Bullet Burger.” They were usually made from the cheapest ground beef which had the highest fat content and therefore tasted best and had the best texture. Mom pan-seared them in half pound bricks, applying large slabs of a tangy processed cheese called Old English. When they were medium-rare and cheese was melted, they landed on pillowy sesame seed buns. That was it. No lettuce. No tomato. No sauce. No nothing. They were excellent because they were simple. That was back when ground beef was different, too.

THE AGE OF BURGER

Today, I read about constant e-coli outbreaks, pink slime and massive recalls. It horrifies me enough that I choose to not eat any store-bought ground beef, preferring to grind and cook my own, because otherwise it’s hard to know what’s in my burger. I have tried most of Seattle’s “gourmet burger” joints, and so far, the best has not ranked as well as mom’s. I stopped asking for medium-rare altogether because I received a lecture and a burger that’s well-done anyway.

When the moderator of my wine tasting group suggests “grabbing a burger” after group, I’m dubious. Will it be another lecture or just another tasteless slab of cardboard? I like a good value, too. And at $15, their suggested burger needs to convince me.

BurgerToRule032718

Enter, Lecosho: its burger is served true medium-rare–a feat in Seattle. A toasted ciabatta bun soaks up all that juiciness yet it’s still crunchy (How do they do that?). Add-on smokey bacon mingles with tangy Beecher’s Flagship cheddar and a half pound of Painted Hills beef in a perfect menage-a-trois; arugula cuts in with a bitter vegetal note; spicy aioli adds another layer of complexity while a piquant crunch of pickled red onion and house pickle cleanses the palate. Massive. And magnificent. My incredulity is eclipsed by a snarky grin; all I can think of is that line in Pulp Fiction: “MmmHmmm–this IS a tasty burger!”

KEEP IT SECRET KEEP IT SAFE

Interestingly, Lecosho isn’t a burger joint, and their burger is not offered on their dinner menu–yet that’s what it excels at. It’s an elegant but laid-back place, tucked away in the Harbor Steps near Seattle Art Museum and Benaroya Hall–a perfect secret getaway for lunch, dinner or late night. I’ve tasted other dishes and they’re delicious, but to me the burger is special. So special it dawns on me it just might be The One Burger to rule them all. I cogitate. Could it be? Perhaps. But I’m sure it won’t be as good when I return, right?

Wrong. It wasn’t an anomaly. If you order the burger during the day, it comes with either soup of the day or salad; if late-night, salad only. Normally, I’m not a huge fan of the side salad, but in this case, it shines: lightly dressed, clean bright flavors compliment the burger’s salty/fatty/juicy flavors and textures.

I’ve tried many others who claim to be the best, and there are many dedicated burger-only shops in Seattle. Some may look more spectacular; some are larger; some more expensive. I have not found one that tastes better.

I have found The One Burger to rule them all.

IF YOU GO
LECOSHO is located at 89 University Street in the Harbor Steps along 1st Avenue in Seattle. If you like a large, juicy cheeseburger, I invite you to “go grab a burger” during lunch or late night. It’s a great place to relax after a busy day.
All images and content copyright ©2018 Eric Schadel. All rights reserved.

 

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